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Your Two Year Old

twos_devmile.jpg

Developmental Milestones.

The terrible two’s aren’t so, so terrible after all. There’s plenty of talking, discovery of free will and pretend play. Here are some key milestones to look for according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.
 


      

twos_devmilelg.jpg Developmental Milestones
Your Two-Year Old

 
The terrible two’s aren’t so, so terrible after all. There’s plenty of talking, discovery of free will and pretend play. Here are some key milestones to look for according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.
 
 
 
Movement milestones
* Walks alone
* Pulls toys behind her while walking
* Carries large toy or several toys while walking
* Begins to run
* Stands on tiptoe
* Kicks a ball
* Climbs onto and down from furniture unassisted
* Walks up and down stairs holding on to support
 
Milestones in hand and finger skills
* Scribbles spontaneously
* Turns over container to pour out contents
* Builds tower of four blocks or more
* Might use one hand more frequently than the other
 
Language milestones
* Points to object or picture when it’s named for him
* Recognizes names of familiar people, objects, and body
  parts
* Says several single words (by fifteen to eighteen months)
* Uses simple phrases (by eighteen to twenty-four months)
* Uses two- to four-word sentences
* Follows simple instructions
* Repeats words overheard in conversation
 
Cognitive milestones
* Finds objects even when hidden under two or three covers
* Begins to sort by shapes and colors
* Begins make-believe play
 
Social and emotional milestones
* Imitates behavior of others, especially adults and older
  children
* Increasingly aware of herself as separate from others
* Increasingly enthusiastic about company of other children
* Demonstrates increasing independence
* Begins to show defiant behavior
* Increasing episodes of separation anxiety toward midyear,
  then they fade
 
Developmental Health Watch: 
Alert
your child’s doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the
following signs of possible developmental delay for this age range:
* Frequent falling and difficulty with stairs
* Persistent drooling or very unclear speech
* Cannot build a tower of more than four blocks
* Difficulty manipulating small objects
* Cannot copy a circle by age 3
* Cannot communicate in short phrases
* No involvement in "pretend" play
* Does not understand simple instructions
* Little interest in other children
* Extreme difficulty separating from mother or primary
  caregiver
* Poor eye contact
* Limited interest in toys
* Experiences a dramatic loss of skills he or she once had

 

 

 



      

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