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Developmental Milestones

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Your 18-24 Month Old

Things are really taking off now! Your little man or little lady is off running, jumping, climbing and leaving you in the dust.  Lace up the track shoes, Moms, and take a power nap, it’s time for full-blown toddlerhood. Here’s what to expect from your 18-24 month old.
 


      

devmilestones_18-24lg.jpg Developmental Milestones
Your 18-24 Month Old

 
Things are really taking off now! Your little man or little lady is off running, jumping, climbing and leaving you in the dust.  Lace up the track shoes, Moms, and take a power nap, it’s time for full-blown toddlerhood. Here’s what to expect from your 18-24 month old.
 



Here
comes your little chatterbox! Toward the end of the second year, the
average toddler can 30 to 50 words and make two-word sentences. You’ll
be even more impressed by their ability to understand and follow simple
commands. Of course, understanding doesn’t always mean obeying. These
days, No! is the new favorite word and your modern parenting ideals may
be tested as you figure out the best way to discipline and set
boundaries.  It’s great to have new fangled ideas about time-outs, but
when you get frustrated by a million No’s!  Grandma’s wooden spoon idea
sure starts to look enticing.  
Don’t worry! You can do this.
Remember to set clear limits by telling her what is and is not
acceptable behavior. She won’t always remember what you’ve said, but
with repetition she’ll start getting the idea. And do your best to set
a good example; model the kindness, respect, and good manners you’d
like to see her demonstrate. Kids mimic everything, especially the
stuff you don’t want them to repeat!

 
Here’s what else to look for in general at this stage:

Master new motor milestones. This
can include everything from stacking three to six blocks on top of each
other and opening a door to throwing a ball overhead and running and
jumping. When it comes to stairs, the typical progression over this
time frame is from needing a parent’s hand to start to walk instead of
crawling up/scooting down stairs to walking up and down stairs alone,
placing both feet on each step. That said, don’t be fooled into
thinking that that your toddler no longer needs adult supervision on
stairs just yet.

Learn to deal with new emotions.
Many 18- to 24-month-olds show anxiety around other toddlers,
especially if they are unfamiliar, and also become anxious in
anticipation of unpleasant events. And while temper tantrums are not
necessarily a new phenomenon at this age, toddlers often perfect them
as they approach two years of age. The typical two-year-old has also
learned how to soothe himself, and starts to become more aware of other
people’s emotions, reacting to anger and affection among other family
members.

May become interested in toilet training.
This varies widely but typically from just under two years of age to
well beyond the third birthday. While trying to force a child to toilet
train before they are ready is all but guaranteed to be a losing
battle, the period between 18 to 24 months is a particularly good age
to start casually teaching your child about the toilet and potty, about
the words used to describe his bodily functions, and to let him see
others in the family using the toilet.

Other Milestones to Look For:

Physical Development
•  Likes to run, but can’t always stop
   and turn well
•  Drinks from a straw
•  Feeds self with a spoon
•  Helps wash hands
•  Stacks 4-6 blocks
•  Tosses or rolls a large ball
•  Opens cabinets, drawers and boxes
•  Bends over to pick up toy without
    falling
•  Walks up steps with help
•  Takes steps backward
•  Enjoys sitting on, and moving small-
    wheeled riding toys
• 
Begins to gain some control of
    bowels and bladder; complete control
    may
not be achieved until around
    age 3 (boys often do not complete
    toilet learning until age 3 1/2)

 

Mental Development
•  Has a vocabulary of several hundred
    words, including names of a few toys
•  Uses two to three word sentences
•  Echoes single words that are spoken
    by someone else
•  Talks to self and “jabbers”
    expressively
•  Has “favorite” toys
•  Likes to choose between two objects
•  Hums or tries to sing
•  Listens to short rhymes or
    fingerplays
•  Points to eyes, ears, or nose when
    asked
•  Uses the words “Please” and“Thank
    you” if prompted
•  Enjoys singing familiar songs

Social and Emotional Development

•  Likes to imitate others
•  Begins to show signs of indepen-
    dence; says “no”
•  Has difficulty sharing
•  Very possessive
•  Finds it difficult to wait and wants it
    right now!
•  Gets angry sometimes and has
    temper tantrums
•  Acts shy around strangers
•  Comforts a distressed friend or
    parent
•  Refers to self by name
•  Uses the words “me”and “mine”
•  Enjoys looking at picture books
•  Tries to do many things alone
•  Enjoys pretending (wearing hats,
    talking on phone)
•  Enjoys exploring; gets into
    everything, and requires constant
    supervision
•  Generally unable to remember rules
•  Often gets physically aggressive
    when frustrated — slaps, hits
•  Shows affection by returning a hug
    or kiss

WHAT TO WATCH FOR
You should not hesitate to talk to your pediatrician about any concerns you may have, or if your toddler does not:

Say more than 30-50 words and put at least two words together by her second birthday
* Follow simple commands
* Sleep through the night
* Try to use a fork, spoon, or a cup

Source: Family Life 8, Iowa State University, University Extension.

Editor’s Note:
The developmental information provided in this article and on this site
has been compiled from various professional resources as a tool to help
you understand your child’s overall growth. It is not a standardized
measurement tool. Always speak to your doctor about your child’s
development.

 
     

 




Here comes your little chatterbox! Toward the end of the second year, the average toddler can 30 to 50 words and make two-word sentences. You’ll be even more impressed by their ability to understand and follow simple commands. Of course, understanding doesn’t always mean obeying. These days, No! is the new favorite word and your modern parenting ideals may be tested as you figure out the best way to discipline and set boundaries.  It’s great to have new fangled ideas about time-outs, but when you get frustrated by a million No’s!  Grandma’s wooden spoon idea sure starts to look enticing.  
Don’t worry! You can do this. Remember to set clear limits by telling her what is and is not acceptable behavior. She won’t always remember what you’ve said, but with repetition she’ll start getting the idea. And do your best to set a good example; model the kindness, respect, and good manners you’d like to see her demonstrate. Kids mimic everything, especially the stuff you don’t want them to repeat!

 
Here’s what else to look for in general at this stage:

Master new motor milestones. This can include everything from stacking three to six blocks on top of each other and opening a door to throwing a ball overhead and running and jumping. When it comes to stairs, the typical progression over this time frame is from needing a parent’s hand to start to walk instead of crawling up/scooting down stairs to walking up and down stairs alone, placing both feet on each step. That said, don’t be fooled into thinking that that your toddler no longer needs adult supervision on stairs just yet.

Learn to deal with new emotions. Many 18- to 24-month-olds show anxiety around other toddlers, especially if they are unfamiliar, and also become anxious in anticipation of unpleasant events. And while temper tantrums are not necessarily a new phenomenon at this age, toddlers often perfect them as they approach two years of age. The typical two-year-old has also learned how to soothe himself, and starts to become more aware of other people’s emotions, reacting to anger and affection among other family members.

May become interested in toilet training. This varies widely but typically from just under two years of age to well beyond the third birthday. While trying to force a child to toilet train before they are ready is all but guaranteed to be a losing battle, the period between 18 to 24 months is a particularly good age to start casually teaching your child about the toilet and potty, about the words used to describe his bodily functions, and to let him see others in the family using the toilet.

Other Milestones to Look For:

Physical Development
•  Likes to run, but can’t always stop
   and turn well
•  Drinks from a straw
•  Feeds self with a spoon
•  Helps wash hands
•  Stacks 4-6 blocks
•  Tosses or rolls a large ball
•  Opens cabinets, drawers and boxes
•  Bends over to pick up toy without
    falling
•  Walks up steps with help
•  Takes steps backward
•  Enjoys sitting on, and moving small-
    wheeled riding toys
• 
Begins to gain some control of
    bowels and bladder; complete control
    may
not be achieved until around
    age 3 (boys often do not complete
    toilet learning until age 3 1/2)

 

Mental Development
•  Has a vocabulary of several hundred
    words, including names of a few toys
•  Uses two to three word sentences
•  Echoes single words that are spoken
    by someone else
•  Talks to self and “jabbers”
    expressively
•  Has “favorite” toys
•  Likes to choose between two objects
•  Hums or tries to sing
•  Listens to short rhymes or
    fingerplays
•  Points to eyes, ears, or nose when
    asked
•  Uses the words “Please” and“Thank
    you” if prompted
•  Enjoys singing familiar songs

Social and Emotional Development

•  Likes to imitate others
•  Begins to show signs of indepen-
    dence; says “no”
•  Has difficulty sharing
•  Very possessive
•  Finds it difficult to wait and wants it
    right now!
•  Gets angry sometimes and has
    temper tantrums
•  Acts shy around strangers
•  Comforts a distressed friend or
    parent
•  Refers to self by name
•  Uses the words “me”and “mine”
•  Enjoys looking at picture books
•  Tries to do many things alone
•  Enjoys pretending (wearing hats,
    talking on phone)
•  Enjoys exploring; gets into
    everything, and requires constant
    supervision
•  Generally unable to remember rules
•  Often gets physically aggressive
    when frustrated — slaps, hits
•  Shows affection by returning a hug
    or kiss

WHAT TO WATCH FOR
You should not hesitate to talk to your pediatrician about any concerns you may have, or if your toddler does not:

Say more than 30-50 words and put at least two words together by her second birthday
* Follow simple commands
* Sleep through the night
* Try to use a fork, spoon, or a cup

Source: Family Life 8, Iowa State University, University Extension.

Editor’s Note: The developmental information provided in this article and on this site has been compiled from various professional resources as a tool to help you understand your child’s overall growth. It is not a standardized measurement tool. Always speak to your doctor about your child’s development.



      

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