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Rub, A Dub Dub

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How to Bathe Your Child Safely

Bathtime should be fun. And a great bonding experience with your baby. But according to the National Safety Council most accidents with babies happen in the bath. By following a few safety tips, you can keep bathtime accident-free and a splashing good time.
 


      

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Rub, A Dub Dub
How to Bathe Your Child Safely

Bathtime
should be fun. And a great bonding experience with your baby. But
according to the National Safety Council most accidents with babies
happen in the bath. By following a few safety tips, you can keep
bathtime accident-free and a splashing good time.

 
 

When
you bathe your baby, it’s the ultimate bonding time. It can be
adventurous, exciting, and at times intimidating. I remember trying to
figure out when it was safe to give my baby a “real bath.” I contacted
my physician and she informed me to wait until my baby’s umbilical cord
stump had fallen completely off. In the meantime, I hand washed my baby
with a warm damp cloth. If the umbilical cord stump gets wet it can get
infected. Most babies’ umbilical cord stumps fall off within 1-3 weeks
after birth. When you’re bathing your baby it’s important to know that
there’s a good possibility that your bundle of joy may not enjoy the
experience—not one bit at all. The good news is, over time your baby
will get accustomed to bath time and look forward to the one-on-one
time spent with mommy and daddy.

You’re
going to want to purchase a baby bath if you have not already received
one as a gift. When bathing your baby you should get all the
necessities ready and prepared for bath time. Put cold water in the tub
first, and then hot water in order to reduce the risk of scalding your
baby. If you are really worried about the temperature of the bath
water, purchase a bath thermometer to help you regulate the
temperature—90 degrees Fahrenheit is a good temperature. Use soaps,
shampoos and bubble baths sparingly—overuse may cause the skin to
become too dry; alternate baths with cleaners and water only baths.
Also bring everything you need from baby wash to towels to the cordless
phone into the bathroom so you never have to leave.

Lastly,
and most important: never ever, ever, ever, leave your baby unattended
in the bathtub: babies can drown in less than an inch of water and in
less than sixty seconds. Even if you’re using one of the bath seats,
studies show accidents still happen because parents think they are
safe. Babies have been known to still slip out or tip over in bath
seats, so don’t let your guard down.

Once
you master all of the technicalities of bathing your baby, you can
finally enjoy the experience and use it as definite bonding time. There
is nothing like a good smelling, happy baby!

 

 



      

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