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Your Rescue Guide For Black Skin During Pregnancy

There are several ways our bodies can surprise us during pregnancy but some of those changes are unwelcome. Here are a few tips from Dr. Susan Taylor to deal with the unwanted ones:

 

Problem

I’ve got acne. It’s like I am a teenager all over again.

 

The Fix

It’s those hormones. You may notice small pimples, blackheads, whiteheads or larger spots on your face and body. Dr. Taylor’s advice: “There are a few prescription or over the counter products that an be safely used during pregnancy or while nursing. Get your doctor’s permission first, but she might approve use of benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid. Both of these come in cleansers, creams, gels or lotions, and are typically applied twice daily and require six weeks to have a positive effect on the skin. If your doctor wont give you the OK for these products, concentrate on cleaning your skin properly twice a day. Avoid rubbing or scrubbing or any harsh products. Also, no picking or squeezing. You can try getting facials every few weeks, which can help prevent the follicles or pores from becoming plugged.” Dr. Taylor’s other tips include removing all makeup before bed, avoiding oily or greasy hair products, and wearing your hair off your face.

 

Problem

My skin is getting darker.

 

The Fix

An increase in hormone levels can stimulate your pigment-producing cells and cause hyperpigmentation in various areas, including the upper arms, thighs, genital areas, and abdomen. Dr. Taylor says skin darkening is a common condition that occurs in nine out of ten pregnancies. In her book Brown Skin, she says “On sun exposed areas of the skin, such as the arms and legs, apply a sunscreen with SPF 15 daily to prevent the sun from making any hyperpigmentation worse. Wear sunhats and stay out of direct sunlight. Because the discoloration stems from pregnancy hormones, it will most likely subside on tis own within a few months after you give birth.” You can also consider using products contain soy like Aveeno Positively Radiant, since soy has been demonstrated to even skin tone, according to Dr. Taylor.

 

Problem

I’m sweating all the time.

 

The Fix

Wash with a deodorant soap, such as Lever 2000, and war light colored clothing made from breathable fabrics like cotton. Women, now with larger breasts, often find themselves sweating underneath their boobies. Dr. Taylor says that’s the perfect place – moist and dark – for a yeast or fungal infection to occur. She recommends using a light dusting of unscented powder there and other fold areas of the upper body. Wear only cotton bras, wash them regularly, and remove them at the end of the day to air out the area.

 

Problem

I have the “mask of pregnancy.” What can I do?

 

The Fix

Melasma is a distressing pregnancy by-product and is characterized by light or dark brown patches on central facial areas like the forehead, cheeks, and nose or on the lower part of the face. Sunscreen, sunscreen, sunscreen, should be your mantra, says Dr. Taylor. She suggests avoiding the sun at all costs, since sunlight can further darkening, especially during summer, spring and fall months. Apply SPF 45 daily and reapply every two hours or so. Dr. Taylor recommends one with zinc oxide or titanium dioxide, or both. You should also use foundation with sunscreen. If the areas are very dark, try DermaBlend or CoverMark. Be aware that melasma may not go away on its own after delivery; you may have to seek treatment.

 

Problem

My facial hair is out of control.

 

The Fix

It’s a pregnancy condition known as hirsutism. Dr. Taylor says that if the hair doesn’t bother you, leave it alone. If you feel self- conscious, remove it by waxing, shaving, plucking or threading. Do not use depilatories during pregnancy. But Dr. Taylor says laser hair removal is safe since it uses a light, not radiation.

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