About KimberlyBook Kimberly
Kimberly in the Press
Mocha Manual Media & Consulting
Advertise With Us

Your Baby

yourbaby_sectri.jpg

Your Baby
Second Trimester: Week by Week

Bye-bye morning sickness. Hello morning sex. The second trimester brings renewed energy, more va va voom in the bedroom, and a burning desire to tell the world that you’ve got a chocolate bun in the oven.  Good thing, because you’ll likely have much bigger boobs and an expanded waistline to explain. And at about twenty weeks, a sonogram can typically detect the baby’s gender. We told you it was good stuff.
 


      

yourbaby_sectri.jpg

Your Baby
Second Trimester: Week by Week

Bye-bye morning sickness. Hello morning sex. The second trimester brings renewed energy, more va va voom in the bedroom, and a burning desire to tell the world that you’ve got a chocolate bun in the oven.  Good thing, because you’ll likely have much bigger boobs and an expanded waistline to explain. And at about twenty weeks, a sonogram can typically detect the baby’s gender. We told you it was good stuff.
 
 



By
the time you reach the second trimester (fourteen to twenty-eight
weeks), the riskiest time period for miscarriage has come and gone, so
any anxiety over that should be subsiding. If you’re lucky, you should
feel nausea less frequently and the pesky vomiting has subsided. You
may even feel like a new woman or your old self, but be careful, don’t
overdo it even thought you feel as if you’ve got your groove back.

You may also experience something not so exciting, round ligament pain.
You probably never worried about your round ligaments before pregnancy,
but they are atteached from the pelvis to each side of the uterus. As
your uterus grows, they become stretched, and as you’ll be learning
throughout this pregnancy business, stretching often means hurting.
Note: moving from side to side ot trying to roll over suddenly while
sleeping can make it worse. Try to avoid any sudden movements and take
a warm bath or use a hot water bottle on the area.  Doctors recommend
sleeping in the fetal position, with a pillow underneath your belly and
between your knees to support your top leg.

Let’s face it, there more activity in dem bones, as the ligaments
supporting your abdomen continue to stretch and the joints between your
pelvic bones soften and losen up in anticipation of childbirth. Your
lower spine gets into the mix by continuing to curve backward (you know
the infamous pregnancy stance) to prevent from falling forward from the
weight of your new cargo. All those loose joints combined with a
changed center of gravity and less experience dealing with this
expanded body, make for increased clumsiness.

Headaches may also make a special appearance this trimester, again,
thanks to those hormones. Stress, dehydration, lack of sleep, eyestrain
and hunger can also cause headaches.  Don’t reach for your favorite
pain reliever; remember most aren’t allowed. Try a light snack, some
water and a power nap in a dark room. Think about reducing stress or
try to take a fifteen-minute break every few hours or so at work or at
home to sit quietly and do some deep breathing exercises. And make sure
you’re getting enough sleep at night. If the headaches persist, call
your doctor.

Good news girl, you will likely get your sexual desire back to, now
that you’re getting used to your pregnancy body. With your new curves
and girth, sex can be a little awkward and clumsy, but don’t let that
put you off. Keep trying. And trying

For more specifics on your pregnancy Week by Week, check out this information from the Mayo Clinic:

Week 13: Baby flexes and kicks

You can’t feel it yet, but your baby can move in a jerky fashion —
flexing the arms and kicking the legs. This week, your baby might even
be able to put a thumb in his or her mouth.

Your baby’s eyelids are fused together to protect his or her developing
eyes. Tissue that will become bone is developing around your baby’s
head and within the arms and legs. Tiny ribs may soon appear.

Week 14: Hormones gear up

The effect of hormones becomes apparent this week. For boys, the
prostate gland is developing. For girls, the ovaries move from the
abdomen into the pelvis.

Meconium — which will become your baby’s first bowel movement after
birth — is made in your baby’s intestinal tract. By the end of the
week, the roof of your baby’s mouth will be completely formed.

Week 15: Skin begins to form

week15.jpg

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Your baby at week 15 (13 weeks after conception)


Your
baby’s skin starts out nearly transparent. Eyebrows and scalp hair may
make an appearance. For babies destined to have dark hair, the hair
follicles will begin producing pigment.

The bone and
marrow that make up your baby’s skeletal system are continuing to
develop this week. Your baby’s eyes and ears now have a baby-like
appearance, and the ears have almost reached their final position.

Week 16: Facial expressions are possible 

week16.jpg

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Your baby at week 16 (14 weeks after conception)


Sixteen
weeks into your pregnancy, your baby is between 4 and 5 inches long and
weighs a bit less than 3 ounces. He or she can now make a fist.

Your baby’s eyes are becoming sensitive to light. More developed facial
muscles may lead to various expressions, such as squinting and
frowning. Your baby may have frequent bouts of hiccups as well. For
girls, millions of eggs are forming in the ovaries.


Week 17: Fat accumulates

Fat stores begin to develop under your baby’s skin this week. The fat
will provide energy and help keep your baby warm after birth.


Week 18: Baby begins to hear

week6.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

As
the nerve endings from your baby’s brain "hook up" to the ears, your
baby may hear your heart beating, your stomach rumbling or blood moving
through the umbilical cord. He or she may even be startled by loud
noises. Your baby can swallow this week, too.


Week 19: Lanugo covers baby’s skin

week7.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Your baby’s
delicate skin is now protected with a pasty white coating called
vernix. Under the vernix, a fine, down-like hair called lanugo covers
your baby’s body.

Your baby’s kidneys are already producing urine. The urine is excreted
into the amniotic sac, which surrounds and protects your baby.

As your baby’s hearing continues to improve, he or she may pick up your
voice in conversations — although it’s probably hard to hear clearly
through the amniotic fluid and protective paste covering your baby’s
ears.

Thanks to the millions of motor neurons developing in the brain, your
baby can make reflexive muscle movements. If you haven’t felt movement
yet, you will soon.

 

 


Week 20: The halfway point

Halfway into your pregnancy, your baby is about 6 inches long and
weighs about 9 ounces — a little over half a pound. You’ve probably
begun to feel your baby’s movements.

Under the protection of the vernix, your baby’s skin is thickening and
developing layers. Your baby now has thin eyebrows, hair on the scalp
and well-developed limbs.


Week 21: Nourishment evolves

Although
the placenta provides nearly all of your baby’s nourishment, your baby
will begin to absorb small amounts of sugar from swallowed amniotic
fluid. This week, your baby’s bone marrow starts making blood cells — a
job done by the liver and spleen until this point.


Week 22: Taste buds develop

week10.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

This week, your baby weighs in at about 1 pound.

Taste buds are starting to form on your baby’s tongue, and your baby’s
brain and nerve endings can process the sensation of touch. Your baby
may experiment by feeling his or her face or anything else within reach.

For boys, the testes begin to descend from the abdomen this week. For
girls, the uterus and ovaries are in place — complete with a lifetime
supply of eggs.


Week 23: Lungs prepare for life outside the womb

week23.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Your baby at week 23 (21 weeks after conception)

Your baby’s lungs are beginning to produce surfactant, the substance
that allows the air sacs in the lungs to inflate — and keeps them from
collapsing and sticking together when they deflate. "Practice"
breathing moves amniotic fluid in and out of your baby’s lungs.

Your baby will begin to look more like a newborn as the skin becomes
less transparent and fat production kicks into high gear.


Week 24: Sense of balance develops

By now, your baby weighs about 1 1/2 pounds. Footprints and fingerprints are forming.

Thanks to a fully developed inner ear, which controls balance, your
baby may have a sense of whether he or she is upside-down or right side
up in the womb. You may notice a regular sleeping and waking cycle.

With intensive medical care, babies born at 24 weeks have more than a
50 percent chance of survival. Complications are frequent and serious,
however, such as bleeding in the brain and impaired vision.

Week 25: Exploration continues
Your baby’s hands are now fully developed, although the nerve
connections to the hands have a long way to go. Exploring the
structures inside your uterus may become baby’s prime entertainment.


Week 26: Eyes remain closed

Your baby’s hands are now fully developed, although the nerve
connections to the hands have a long way to go. Exploring the
structures inside your uterus may become baby’s prime entertainment.

Your baby weighs between 1 1/2 and 2 pounds. The eyebrows and eyelashes
are well formed, and the hair on your baby’s head is longer and more
plentiful. Although your baby’s eyes are fully developed, they may not
open for another two weeks.


Week 27: Second trimester ends

Your baby’s hands are now fully developed, although the nerve
connections to the hands have a long way to go. Exploring the
structures inside your uterus may become baby’s prime entertainment.

Your baby weighs between 1 1/2 and 2 pounds. The eyebrows and eyelashes
are well formed, and the hair on your baby’s head is longer and more
plentiful. Although your baby’s eyes are fully developed, they may not
open for another two weeks.

This week marks the end of the second trimester. Your baby’s lungs,
liver and immune system are continuing to mature — and he or she has
been growing like a weed. At 27 weeks, your baby’s length will have
tripled or even quadrupled from the 12-week mark.

If your baby is born this week, the chance of survival is at least 85
percent. However, serious complications are still possible. 

 



      

Leave A Comment